THE COMMUNITY OF INQUIRY
A CoI FOR THE CoI
Welcome to the Community of Inquiry.

Our goal with this Blog is to raise ideas and attempt to resolve issues associated with thinking and learning collaboratively in a purposeful community of inquiry.

I would like to initiate this Blog with a discussion on the topic of confirmation bias. This topic was the focus of a recent article that speaks to the core strength and reason for a community of inquiry approach. To this point, the article by Beran et al. (2015) explores the pressure to conform to the group in a way that is a "barrier to effective communication and learning" (p. 63).

The core message of this longitudinal study for me is that there is risk for conformity in collaborative online learning due to attachment and identification within the group. This is obviously relevant in the current environment of fake news and where individuals are increasingly trapped in their selected bubble. I explored this issue of conformity in some depth in a recent book titled Thinking Collaboratively (Garrison, 2016) that focused on the cognitive dimensions of thinking and learning in a community of inquiry.

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In Ireland, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) reported that in 2012, 98% of 15-year-old pupils have at least one computer at home, but only 64% of pupils reported that they use a computer, laptop, or tablet at school. These findings are based on an analysis of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) data and show that despite the pervasiveness of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in pupils’ daily lives, such technologies have not yet been as widely adopted within the classrooms of formal second level education. When they are used in the classroom, their impact on pupil learning is mixed at best. Yet, the debate about the use of ICT in schools has been replaced by a discourse of inevitability, where schools of the future are presented as ICT rich sites of learning. The ‘space’ created in this discourse of inevitability enables schools and teachers to integrate systems of ICT without guiding epistemological or pedagogical frameworks. 

This study recognised the potential of the Community of Inquiry framework (Garrison et al.
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RECENT ACTIVITY

Yishay Mor
Joined May 24, 2017
Levinsky college of education, Israel


Lisa Marie Blaschke
Joined May 19, 2017
Program director and instructor, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany
I am the program director of the Master of Distance Education and E-Learning (MDE) graduate program at Carl von Ossietzky University of


kadir
Joined May 19, 2017
bahcesehir university, Turkey
PhD in Learning Design & Technology from Purdue


Tanya Beran
Joined May 18, 2017
University of Calgary, Canada


Supporting Discourse using Technology-Mediated Communication: The Community of Inquiry Model in Second Level Education
Adrian O'Connor, Niall Seery, Donal Canty
May 18, 2017
In Ireland, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) reported that in 2012, 98% of 15-year-old pupils have at least one computer at home, but only 64%


Maureen Hencmann
Joined May 16, 2017
Regis University


Confirmation Bias and Fake News
D. Randy Garrison
April 3, 2017
Our goal with this Blog is to raise ideas and attempt to resolve issues associated with thinking and learning collaboratively in a purposeful community of inquiry. I would
The Community of Inquiry is a project of the Centre for Distance Education at Athabasca University, researchers of the Community of Inquiry framework, and members of the CoI community.